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How to get the most out of your Decision Support Quizzes

To make sure your decision support quiz will work well, use automated testing.


Why use a Decision Support Quiz?

Sifting through dense benefits content can be overwhelming for employees. Resulting in only 52% of them really knowing what’s in their benefits package, according to a study produced by Liazon. This explains why employers have taken to adding helpful tools like decision support quizzes into their enrollment platform. 

With these quizzes employers can:

  • Help employees feel confident by making informed decisions about retirement, savings, and health plan choices etc.
  • Show employees they care. In fact, according to HR consultancy Mercer, “… in a very competitive employment environment, Decision Support tools, when effectively communicated, can be a deciding factor for a prospective employee because they are a way to safeguard employee’s complex benefit elections.”
  • Plus free up valuable HR resources. As Ally Edwards writes on the Technology Advice blog, “These tools free your HR department from fielding daily questions and explaining the many differences between plan options. This saved time can now be put towards strategically creating appealing benefits packages and exploring options that help to maximize resources.”

 

But Quiz testing is hard and time-consuming

Since decision support quizzes put employee answers through an algorithm in order to come to an accurate recommendation, mapping out all the possible scenarios in that decision tree is a complicated process. A simple 5 question quiz could have as many as 60 possible branches that need to be linked to a relevant recommendation. And with each additional question, the permutations increase exponentially. Increasing the chance of failures; a branch in the decision tree that doesn’t have any content associated with it.

 

Automated Testing to the Rescue

Instead of manually checking a decision support quiz for failures, which would involve someone taking the quiz multiple times to test every combination of answers, we created software to do that automatically.  The software deploys bots that are customized to the information in your quiz to do what humans would’ve done. But since they can do it infinitely quicker than humans, this process takes seconds rather than hours.  Then, if a bot discovers a combination that results in an error, it takes screenshots and alerts you to the sequence that needs fixing.

 

As Mercer put it “Decision Support tools are not only critical but necessary to enhancing your employees’ open enrollment experience.” which makes it vital that you use automated testing to ensure your quiz works as it’s supposed to.

Philip Joyner

Not only can the man stare down CSS code until it writes itself in sheer terror, but he is famous around 220 E. Hall St for what we like to call his “happy dance”. Few have seen it, and those who have can’t get enough.

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